Ramadan is the month of giving, and the conglomerated feeling of generosity that has embedded the city is contagious regardless of faith, age or ethnicity. FMCG giant OMO has created charity bins at prominent malls (Deira City Centre, MOE and City Centre Mirdif) and even tied up with Uber for free pickups from home. Well-meaning residents have installed refrigerators that can be filled with fresh food and drink for the needy, and Iftar tents have popped up in every nook and cranny installing a sense of brotherhood that is so in line with the teachings of Islam.

Islamic quote the best among you are those who bring the greatest benefits to many others blog

 

How have you been giving back this Ramadan?

With shorter work hours, I’ve taken the time to clear out the wardrobe and used the Uber service to send off 3 big piles of clothes to the OMO initiative. I’ve also sent a home-cooked meal to my building watchmen (more on that in a separate post), yet there is one more thing I am planning to add to the list… give blood.

For Non-Muslims, the notion of fasting from dawn to dusk sans any liquids can sound very daunting. As a practicing Muslim, I get asked about this all the time. The truth is our bodies are the most amazing, adaptable machines and ask any fasting muslim, it really does get easier by Day 2 itself.

Why do we do it? It is ordained by the Almighty for a number of reasons. It gives our bodies a much needed break (the idea of intermittent fasting is only just gaining popularity in mainstream media, but we have been doing it all along!), it helps us develop the virtue of patience and brotherhood, and brings the community together.

In the recent past, the evidence showcasing the endless benefits of fasting has been gaining momentum, and that would be a topic that would stretch across a number of blog posts. One of the lesser known benefits of Islamic fasting is the positive effect it has on fertility. Today’s guest post is by the very articulate Dr. Monikaa Chawla, a Reproductive endocrinologist and fertility specialist at Fakih IVF Abu Dhabi, who has been practicing the subspecialty for more than 16 years. Dr. Monikaa is not a Muslim and this is what makes her unbiased, scientifically backed reasonings behind the positive link of Islamic fasting and fertility a very interesting one! Read on for more.

Ramadan, the holy month of fasting, is scheduled to commence next week. With a plethora of Iftar options being offered around the city, Dubai diners are truly spoilt for choice. Fancy having an Iftar meal in the majestic surroundings of an Arabesque majlis? Le Meridien Dubai Hotel & Conference Centre is revamping the interiors of their Falcon Ballroom this Ramadan. Enter the Layali Zaman Ramadan Majlis, and embrace the auspicious grace of the holy month.

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Ramadan, the holy month of fasting observed by Muslims the world over, will commence around the 18th of June this year. During this entire month, Muslims refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. This fast is observed for spiritual growth, to increase empathy for the less fortunate, to celebrate the divinity of the Almighty, and to cleanse impurities of both the body and mind.

The association of dates with Ramadan is significant from both a religious and a health point of view. Today’s post explores the significance of dates in Islam. We look at a collection of Hadiths (verified quotes by Prophet Mohammed (PBUH) ) and put it side by side with the scientific the know-how of today.

hadith in dates there is a cure